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Porphyry of Tyre (c. 234–305 CE)

Porphyry of Tyre (c. 234–305 CE) was a Neoplatonic philosopher from Tyre, Phoenicia. He is sometimes called the Father of Neoplatonism” for his influential writings on the philosophy of Plato. He studied philosophy in Athens, and was a student of Plotinus, the founder of Neoplatonism. He wrote extensively on a wide range of topics, including theology, religion, ethics, metaphysics, and cosmology. His works included commentaries on Aristotle, Plato, and other ancient philosophers. He was also an advocate of polytheism, and wrote numerous works defending the traditional Gods of Greek and Roman mythology against the Christian faith. He also wrote critiques of Christianity, Judaism, and other religions. His works have been influential in the development of many philosophical traditions, including Neoplatonism, Gnosticism, and Hermeticism.

Porphyry of Tyre is generally considered to be the most important writer on astrology in the ancient world. He wrote numerous works on the subject, including his main work, the Introduction to Astrology (Περὶ Αστρολογίας Εισαγωγή). In this work, he discussed the various aspects of astrology and the way in which it can be used to understand and interpret the world. He was a firm believer in the power of astrology and argued that it could be used to gain knowledge of the future and to gain insight into human behavior. He also argued that astrology could be used to help guide decision-making and give advice about the best course of action to take. Porphyry also wrote about the influence of the stars and planets on human life and how to interpret dreams and omens.

Translations:

Porphyry the Philosopher: Introduction to the Tetrabiblos, and Serapio of Alexandria: Astrological Definitions, trans. James Herschel Holden, American Federation of Astrologers, Tempe, AZ, 2009. >>

Porphyry of Tyre, An Introduction to the Tetrabiblos of Ptolemy, trans. Andrea L. Gehrz, The Moira Press, Portland, OR, 2010. >>

Bibliography:

Gehrz, Andrea L. (trans.), Porphyry of Tyre, An Introduction to the Tetrabiblos of Ptolemy, The Moira Press, Portland, OR, 2010. >>

Holden, James Herschel (trans.), Porphyry the Philosopher: Introduction to the Tetrabiblos, and Serapio of Alexandria: Astrological Definitions, American Federation of Astrologers, Tempe, AZ, 2009. >>

Schmidt, Robert H., Definitions and Foundations, The Golden Hind Press, Cumberland, MD, 2009. >>

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